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Old 25th April 2017, 14.55:32   #331-0 (permalink)
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Default Re: The sad case of a founding members and player of Wrexham Football Club

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Originally Posted by eastsussexred View Post
The Crispin Inn was situated on Mold Road, possibly somewhere around where B&Q is today and was still in existence in the mid 18th Century.

I have also found that there were taverns in Wrexham called 'The Shoemakers' and 'Cordwain's Arms'.
Cordwainers were traditionally high-end tradesmen who used superior materials to make footwear. Organisations of Cordwainers in Britain were first granted ordinances in the 13th Century.
There are no records to say where these 2 Taverns were located, but the lack of information in the archives itself, suggests that these Taverns may have been of early origin.
Cordwainers Arms was still in existence in the 1660's
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File Type: jpg Cordwainers Arms 1660s.jpg (157.0 KB, 45 views)
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Old 26th April 2017, 13.48:13   #332-0 (permalink)
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Default Re: The sad case of a founding members and player of Wrexham Football Club

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THE SHOEMAKERS

In 1620, a survey was made of the possessions of Charles- Prince of Wales, including the Lordship of Bromfield and Yale, of which, Wrexham was included.
The survey, which was compiled in Latin, was later translated and summarised in a series of books by Wrexham historian- Alfred Neobard Palmer, and which were published at the end of the 19th Century.
The Survey recorded that much of the trade in Wrexham at the begining of the 17th Century revolved around agriculture and livestock markets, with the consequential manufacture of flannel, gloves and leather goods, such as shoes and boots, which were sold in local shops, and provided much of the income of the town’s inhabitants, although there were also quite a few small-scale malt kilns in the town at that time.
The survey also recorded the street names and the names of fields in the area, and Palmer noticed that many of the fields (some of which were separated into smaller parcels of land) were named according to the crafts and trades, which historically had provided the industry of the town; - such as Butchers Field, Glovers Hollow, Receivers Field (receiver for the Lordship) and the Field of the Tenter-hooks (later known as Tenters Field) etc. Additionally, he noted, that many of these field names were listed in an earlier record ‘The Common Fields’ of Wrexham (1562) and he concluded that the field names dated back to a time when the industry of the town was being established (the leather industry in Wrexham, for example, has been dated back to the 14th Century) with traders or groups of traders gradually buying the freehold or leasehold of parcels of land, and that these ancient field names of old Medieval Wrexham had carried through to the 17th Century.
Palmer then specifically identified two parcels of land; - Shoemakers Mound, off Chester Road, and Shoemakers Hollow, near Bradley Road, and he linked both of these plots with the area of land that we know as The Racecourse.

‘On one side of Crispin Lane is a piece of land, now traversed by the Great Western Railway line, which was formerly called "Crispin field" and on the other side of the same lane was a large field (on the north side of the present Race Course) known as "Crispin croft".
The triangular croft in the apex of which Crispin Lodge has been built, and whose base forms one side of Stansty Park, is called " Crispin meadow," while a second "Crispin field" lies opposite to it on the other side of the Mold Road.
Now these several closes, or three of them, seem to have been connected with a tavern which once stood in Stansty, called “The Crispin Inn." But St. Crispin was the patron saint of shoemakers; and it may very well be that in the name of this
inn we have another indication of the former existence in Wrexham of some such incorporated society of these craftsmen as has been supposed.
Whatever be the explanation of the names which have been
cited, they are, it cannot be denied, very curious and interesting.’
A.N. Palmer
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Originally Posted by eastsussexred View Post
In summary, he concluded that as the trade of the Medieval town increased, an organistion or Guild of Shoemakers was formed and they invested their combined profits to buy parcels of land, including a number of fields which became known as Crispins Fields (after St Crispin- the Patron Saint of their organisation) and a tavern called The Crispin Inn.

The lower section of these fields would come to be known as The Racecourse.
Quote:
Originally Posted by eastsussexred View Post
The Crispin Inn was situated on Mold Road, possibly somewhere around where B&Q is today and was still in existence in the mid 18th Century.

I have also found that there were taverns in Wrexham called 'The Shoemakers' and 'Cordwain's Arms'.
Cordwainers were traditionally high-end tradesmen who used superior materials to make footwear. Organisations of Cordwainers in Britain were first granted ordinances in the 13th Century.
There are no records to say where these 2 Taverns were located, but the lack of information in the archives itself, suggests that these Taverns may have been of early origin.
Quote:
Originally Posted by eastsussexred View Post
Cordwainers Arms was still in existence in the 1660's
In the attachment of my previous post, William Lewis is a Corvisor (another term for a cordwainer/shoemaker) who's shop was situated at the base of Town Hill, and who was associated with The Cordwainers Arms in 1666. It is also known that there were areas in Medieval Wrexham known as Shoemaker’s Mound and Shoemaker’s Hollow, and that there was another tavern in the town, known as The Shoemaker’s.
Additionally, there was a Crispin Inn at Lower Stansty (now known as Plas Coch) and Wrexham historian A.N. Palmer had hypothesized that an ancient guild of shoemakers may have been responsible for the existence of The Crispin Inn, as St Crispin was the patron Saint of Shoemakers. The Crispin Inn, which was still in existence in the mid 1700’s, also lent its name to the Crispin Field’s, on which, The Racecourse was later built. I have found no specific records relating to a date when The Crispin Inn may have been built, but it is known that Plas Coch (meaning Red Hall) was built around 1580/90 for Sir William Meredith of Stansty, who was The High Sheriff of Stansty and who was the treasurer and paymaster for the British army in the campaigns in The Netherlands, during the reigns of Queen Elizabeth I and King James I. In 1608, Sir William issued a contract to his brother- Edward Meredith (a draper and trader in London) to supply the uniforms and footwear for the soldiers of the army, although Sir William died later that same year and Plas Coch was passed to his family, with Edward Meredith holding the lease. Edward Meredith would also become The High Sheriff of Stansty in 1629, and it may well be, that if A.N. Palmer’s hypothesis regarding a guild of shoemakers is correct, then a possible date range for the construction of The Crispin Inn, would be the first few decades of the 1600’s, due to Edward Meredith’s trade associations. From this point, the area on which the Racecourse was later built, would become known as Crispins Fields, with Crispin Lane running through its lower boundaries.

Last edited by eastsussexred; 26th April 2017 at 13.50:33..
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Old 26th April 2017, 13.52:00   #333-0 (permalink)
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Default Re: The sad case of a founding members and player of Wrexham Football Club

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Cordwainers Arms was still in existence in the 1660's
There was a pub on the Holt Road called the London Apprentice and parts of it are still there on the bank behind the now closed Greddington.
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Old 26th April 2017, 14.45:01   #334-0 (permalink)
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Default Re: The sad case of a founding members and player of Wrexham Football Club

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There was a pub on the Holt Road called the London Apprentice and parts of it are still there on the bank behind the now closed Greddington.
Thanks CF, I will see what I can find out.
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Old 28th April 2017, 15.11:46   #335-0 (permalink)
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Default Re: The sad case of a founding members and player of Wrexham Football Club

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Originally Posted by eastsussexred View Post
In the attachment of my previous post, William Lewis is a Corvisor (another term for a cordwainer/shoemaker) who's shop was situated at the base of Town Hill, and who was associated with The Cordwainers Arms in 1666. It is also known that there were areas in Medieval Wrexham known as Shoemaker’s Mound and Shoemaker’s Hollow, and that there was another tavern in the town, known as The Shoemaker’s.
Additionally, there was a Crispin Inn at Lower Stansty (now known as Plas Coch) and Wrexham historian A.N. Palmer had hypothesized that an ancient guild of shoemakers may have been responsible for the existence of The Crispin Inn, as St Crispin was the patron Saint of Shoemakers. The Crispin Inn, which was still in existence in the mid 1700’s, also lent its name to the Crispin Field’s, on which, The Racecourse was later built. I have found no specific records relating to a date when The Crispin Inn may have been built, but it is known that Plas Coch (meaning Red Hall) was built around 1580/90 for Sir William Meredith of Stansty, who was The High Sheriff of Stansty and who was the treasurer and paymaster for the British army in the campaigns in The Netherlands, during the reigns of Queen Elizabeth I and King James I. In 1608, Sir William issued a contract to his brother- Edward Meredith (a draper and trader in London) to supply the uniforms and footwear for the soldiers of the army, although Sir William died later that same year and Plas Coch was passed to his family, with Edward Meredith holding the lease. Edward Meredith would also become The High Sheriff of Stansty in 1629, and it may well be, that if A.N. Palmer’s hypothesis regarding a guild of shoemakers is correct, then a possible date range for the construction of The Crispin Inn, would be the first few decades of the 1600’s, due to Edward Meredith’s trade associations. From this point, the area on which the Racecourse was later built, would become known as Crispins Fields, with Crispin Lane running through its lower boundaries.
There is, though, another possibility regarding the origins of The Crispin Inn, in Stansty

At the end of Owain Glyndwr’s war against Henry IV (1400-1415) Wales was left devastated. Extensive destruction of towns, villages and agricultural land took decades to repair, and industry and commerce in Wales all but ground to a halt; moreover, politically, the country ceased to exist in its own right.

When King Henry IV died in 1413, he was succeeded to the throne by his son- Henry, Lord of Monmouth and Brecon (crowned King Henry V at Westminster Abbey on 9th April 1413) and almost immediately, Henry V offered pardons to the remaining Welsh rebels. In 1415, as Henry prepared for War in France, he also offered a pardon to Owain Glyndwr, but never received a response and Owain Glyndwr was never seen again.
Henry then assembled a force of 10,500 men (including 500 Welsh Archers and 23 men-at arms) and sailed to France, although there was no recruiting for any fighting men in North Wales, as the region was still not trusted by the English at that time, and so the Welsh contingent were recruited almost entirely of men from Monmouth and Brecon.
In France, the forces laid siege to the port of Harfleur, in Normandy, which surrendered after five weeks, but Henry had lost many of his soldiers to disease and battle injuries, and so he planned to march to Calais, where he would meet up with his ships and sail back to England. At Agincourt, however, his route was blocked by a French army, 20,000 strong, and at 11am on 25th October, French knights, weighed down by heavy armor, began a slow advance across the muddy battlefield.
Outnumbered three to one, Henry’s army stood their ground and his longbow archers (many of whome were Welsh) let leash a hail of arrows, which stopped the French in their tracks. As more and more French soldiers tried to advance, they too became clogged down in mud and were also slain by the archers. Around 6,000 Frenchmen lost their lives at Agincourt, including 40% of the French nobility, while English and Welsh losses amounted to just over 400. The news of victory spurred a period of celebrations across England and parts of Wales, and the 25th of October 1415- St Crispin’s day, became etched into the national psyche, as the day that The Battle of Agincourt was won against overwhelming odds. The victory also gave rise to the name of St Crispin specifically being used for taverns and inns, with a number of new ‘Crispin Inns’ first appearing in records from the early 15th Century. History of the Crispin Inn
Prior to his French campaign, Henry V had placed himself under the spiritual protection of the 7th-century Welsh virgin martyr- St Winefride, and after his return, he visited Shrewsbury Abbey, where the relics of the saint were enshrined, before continuing his pilgrimage 60 miles to St Winefride’s Well (Holywell, Flintshire) the place where she was allegedly beheaded before being miraculously restored to life. There is no record of the route that Henry V took from Shrewsbury to Holywell, and so it does open the possibility that he also passed through Wrexham en route.

Last edited by eastsussexred; 28th April 2017 at 15.23:16..
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Old 28th April 2017, 15.36:19   #336-0 (permalink)
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Default Re: The sad case of a founding members and player of Wrexham Football Club (Massive history thread!)

Another consequence of Agincourt was the 2 fingered salute given by the welsh archers to the French to show they were ready for battle.
This was a result of the French cutting off the first 2 fingers of archers if caught, thus preventing them pulling back the string of the bow.....

Now on a different footing, as we know the all blacks do the haka as laying down a challenge prior to an international.....I firmly believe we the welsh should respond by giving our ancient archers salute in response to the haka to show we also are ready for battle.......

Forgive me on this totally different tangent..........."Roman soldier walks into a bar holds his 2 fingers up and says 5 beers please.""
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Old 28th April 2017, 18.09:25   #337-0 (permalink)
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Default Re: The sad case of a founding members and player of Wrexham Football Club (Massive history thread!)

Some great stuff on Crispin lane and I never knew about the 2 fingered salute.
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Old 28th April 2017, 18.45:51   #338-0 (permalink)
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Default Re: The sad case of a founding members and player of Wrexham Football Club (Massive history thread!)

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Some great stuff on Crispin lane and I never knew about the 2 fingered salute.
I have been researching the land that the Racecourse was later built on jonesfach, and I am looking for links that tie in this region with the birth of the nation of Wales itself, and specifically how the land at Plas Coch may connect to this. Certainly, Stansty has links to the early Kings of Powys and Wat's Dyke was an Anglo Saxon frontier that the Kings of Powys eventually conquered, prior to the Norman Conquest of England.
Hopefully anything I find will help to secure the future of The Racecourse.
As a sporting venue, the Racecourse can now be dated back to the 18th Century, but hopefully I will find confirmation that links The Racecourse to other evidence I have found, of horseracing in Wrexham in the 1600's, though I cant definately say as yet, whether these races took place on The Racecourse.

Last edited by eastsussexred; 28th April 2017 at 18.56:07..
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Old 30th April 2017, 15.45:38   #339-0 (permalink)
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Default Re: The sad case of a founding members and player of Wrexham Football Club (Massive history thread!)

Charles James Apperley was born to a wealthy family, in 1778, at Pas Gronow (now demolished) near Wrexham. From an early age, he spent much of his childhood riding horses, but he was sent away to be educated at Rugby School in Warwickshire, in 1790, before joining the Ancient British Light Dragoons, under the command of Sir Watkin Williams Wynn, in 1798.
After serving in Ireland, he married the daughter of a Caernarvonshire landowner in 1801, and then settled in Warwickshire, where he devoted himself to fox hunting and the chase.
In 1813, he became the agent for his brother-in-law's estates, and he moved to Llanbeblig, near Caernarvon, where he began to contribute a series of articles to The Sporting Magazine, covering horse racing and hunt meetings, under the pseudenym of "Nimrod".
For the next 20 years, Nimrod published a series of sporting memoirs and reminiscences, and in 1842, the year before his death, he published the memoirs of his early life in Wrexham, in a general and literary journal, known as Fraser's Magazine (attached).
He recalls his childhood friendships with the sons of a Gresford Vicar- Mr Newcome, and recounts a day when the boys were eager to leave the table after eating, as they wished to ride into Wrexham, where the Wrexham Races were taking place.
Charles (Nimrod) wrote that Wrexham Races now (1842) ranked high amonst provincial meetings of the kind, but recalled that in his boyhood days the "race meetings were only in their infancy at that time, little better indeed than what are called leather-plate races."
His memoirs in this instance referred to the days prior to his schooling at Rugby in 1790, and as he was a sports writer and an ex serviceman in Sir Watkin William Wynn's dragoons, he would most likely have made reference if the races in his early days took place at a different location in Wrexham than the Raceces he later referred to.

The Wrexham Races 'on the new course' in the year 1800 (attached previously) appear to have been well established, and organised with the first three days of the meeting each resulting in the prizes of a piece of plate to the value of 50 Guineas each, with the fourth day providing sweepstakes of 5 Guineas each, whereas, the 'leather-plate' races that Charles had refered to, were traditionaly, a much rougher affair, with few rules, enabling jockeys to strike each other and resort to pretty much any behaviour that enabled the jockey to win the race.
This suggests that The Wrexham Races evolved from earlier, less controled meetings, with a new course being developed on the existing venue, probably during the 1780's, although, as previously posted, the earlier meetings date back, prior to the year 1700.
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File Type: jpg Wrexham Races prior to 1790.jpg (64.9 KB, 34 views)

Last edited by eastsussexred; 30th April 2017 at 15.57:00..
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Old 4th June 2017, 13.00:59   #340-0 (permalink)
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Default Re: The sad case of a founding members and player of Wrexham Football Club (Massive history thread!)

Stansty- the area on which, The Racecourse was built, had traditionally been divided into tenancies of two parts- Stansty Uchaf (Higher Stansty) and Stansty Isaf, (Lower Stansty- where The Racecourse would later be built) and by the mid-13th Century formed a part of the landed possessions of the Cistercian monks of Valle Crucis Abbey in Llangwestl, near Llangollen, with all tenants recorded as being Welsh. During this period, Stansty was located next to an area of farm land known as Northcroft, which seems logical, as the etymology of the name Stansty is also derived from the old English word ‘stan’ meaning stone (enclosure or path) and the old English word ‘sti’ (sty) which evolved from an old Germanic word relating to pigs, and so it may well be that during a brief period of occupation, the Anglo Saxons continued to farm the land, with the area of Stansty specifically reserved for the farming of pigs, until the Welsh forced the Anglo Saxons back to the new boundary of Wats Dyke in the 9th Century.
The land on which, Our Racecourse was later built, would have been at the very edge of the regained Welsh frontier in the wars against the Anglo Saxons.
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