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Old 21st November 2020, 11.41:09   #831-0 (permalink)
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Default Re: The sad case of a founding members and player of Wrexham Football Club (Massive history thread!)

Quote:
Originally Posted by WasanActonlad View Post
LOL....
let you into a wee little secret..
Sssshhh...dont go telling any one he was actually born in Che...I cant even bring my self to write it...!!
Though he was first member we know of to have played on the racecourse...a wrexham constabulary v someone match in the 1880's.

You do know ES...Saturdays are not Saturdays unless you've contributed to this thread..
Sorry WAL, I couldnt resist, but I have removed my original reply to maintain your great grandad's anonymity.
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Old 21st November 2020, 12.32:26   #832-0 (permalink)
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Default Re: The sad case of a founding members and player of Wrexham Football Club (Massive history thread!)

Too kind...
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Old 28th November 2020, 09.44:21   #833-0 (permalink)
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Default Re: The sad case of a founding members and player of Wrexham Football Club (Massive history thread!)

Quote:
Originally Posted by WasanActonlad View Post
LOL....
let you into a wee little secret..
Sssshhh...dont go telling any one he was actually born in Che...I cant even bring my self to write it...!!
Though he was first member we know of to have played on the racecourse...a wrexham constabulary v someone match in the 1880's.

You do know ES...Saturdays are not Saturdays unless you've contributed to this thread..
As you will know, he played against The Prince of Wales Fire Brigade on The Racecourse in 1884 WAL

https://newspapers.library.wales/vie...54/4591462/79/

The return match on The racecourse took place in 1887, although your great granddad wasn’t in that team.

https://newspapers.library.wales/vie...51/4592358/44/
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Old 28th November 2020, 13.50:00   #834-0 (permalink)
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Default Re: The sad case of a founding members and player of Wrexham Football Club (Massive history thread!)

As said previously Saturdays are not Saturdays without a contribution by yourself to this thread
But for a personal contribution well thank you sir you've bowled me over...
Personally I believe reason for non appearance for second game .....he may have remained in the bar..!!!
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Old 28th November 2020, 14.11:56   #835-0 (permalink)
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Default Re: The sad case of a founding members and player of Wrexham Football Club (Massive history thread!)

That is was still in the bar from the original game...
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Old 28th November 2020, 15.17:18   #836-0 (permalink)
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Default Re: The sad case of a founding members and player of Wrexham Football Club (Massive history thread!)

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That is was still in the bar from the original game...
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Old 30th November 2020, 15.23:37   #837-0 (permalink)
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Default Re: The sad case of a founding members and player of Wrexham Football Club (Massive history thread!)

Adding to the history - unless its already been covered.

The country suffered from gales on the 1st and 2nd of January 1925. The newspapers of the time referred to one of the stands at The Wrexham Football Club having been blown down.

Bangor of Dee was isolated and the River Severn in Mid Wales had severe floods over 30 miles with scores of houses inundated.
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Old 30th November 2020, 19.11:16   #838-0 (permalink)
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Default Re: The sad case of a founding members and player of Wrexham Football Club (Massive history thread!)

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Adding to the history - unless its already been covered.

The country suffered from gales on the 1st and 2nd of January 1925. The newspapers of the time referred to one of the stands at The Wrexham Football Club having been blown down.

Bangor of Dee was isolated and the River Severn in Mid Wales had severe floods over 30 miles with scores of houses inundated.
There is a picture in this thread somewhere.
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Old 6th December 2020, 16.15:33   #839-0 (permalink)
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Default Re: The sad case of a founding members and player of Wrexham Football Club (Massive history thread!)

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There is a picture in this thread somewhere.
As below link from 2017, Rhosymedre Red.
The stand, which was first erected in 1924, accommodated 2,000 supporters and was known as ‘The Shed’. It was paid for by The Supporters Association, but was blown down in a storm in September of that year (as per link below) and re-erected by fans before being blown down again on January 1st 1925

The sad case of a founding members and player of Wrexham Football Club (Massive history thread!)

I had originally believed that The Shed was located at the Plas Coch end of the ground, but later learned that it was erected on the popular (Yale side) of the pitch (as attached).

The first Plas Coch stand accommodated 2,500 supporters and had a barrel shaped roof, painted in blue and white stripes, which was built in 1921.


The Turf Hotel is comprised of two individual buildings, which were each built at different times. The Turf Tavern (the lower section of The Turf Hotel) was built at some point between 1793 and 1819, and The Grandstand (the taller section with a balcony; where the bar area is today) was built sometime prior to 1833. Both of these buildings were later joined together to form the current Turf Hotel.

In the early days of racing at Y Cae Ras, temporary wooden stands were built at either side of The Turf Tavern and dismantled at the end of the race meetings each year. The earliest evidence for this comes from a newspaper report of the 1811 races, in which one of the stands collapsed and a spectator suffered a broken leg.

1854. The first permanent stand was a stone- built structure with wooden plank seating, built on the Mold Road side of the course. The stand was separated from the Turf Tavern by a gate that provided access onto the course. The Turf Tavern was also adapted with offices for race officials and changing rooms for jockeys, which were later used as changing rooms for footballers.

After the birth of Wrexham AFC in 1864, simple open air seating was gradually re-introduced to the side of the pitch on the Northern (Yale side) of the ground. The seating consisted of continuous lines of wooden planks that ran parallel along the entire length of the pitch, and which were elevated in steps that were 7 rows high.

1869. The Mold Road Stand was repaired and upgraded

1890. The Mold Road stand was renovated and extended with a new stand that had an additional gate installed at the Plas Coch the end of this stand.

1898. The club committee formulated plans to erect the first covered stand on the popular, northern (Yale side) of the pitch, although the work was not started.

1900, Instead of erecting a covered stand on the Yale side of the pitch, the club decided to refurbish and extend the Mold Road stand and install a roof onto this stand

1913. Major revamp of the stadium prior to the Wales v Scotland International match on 3rd March. The Mold Road stand was extended again and additional seating was provided on the flat ground between the Mold Road stand and the touchline. The height of the banks behind each goal were also increased, particularly at the Crispin Lane end, and some concrete terracing was laid at each end.
The Turf Tavern was renovated and the separate, taller section of the premises, known as The Grandstand was also renovated, internally and externally. These two buildings, which were originally separated by an alleyway, 3 metres wide, had previously been joined together at first floor level by means of lintels which spanned the alley and provided another gated entrance into the ground, but in 1913, the alleyway was bricked up, bringing the two buildings together and forming a lounge area inside of the tavern.


1921. The first covered structure for up to 2,500 standing spectators was erected at the Plas Coch end of the pitch at a cost of £100, which was paid for by the Shareholders Association. At the same time, the height of The Mold Road stand was raised to provide more seating and the height of the terraced embankment at the Crispin Lane end of the ground was again increased.

1924. (May). First covered stand, known as ‘the shed’ erected on the Northern (Yale side) of the pitch at a cost of £360 which was paid by the Shareholders Association. The Association formally handed control of the stand to the football club before the last home game of the 1923/24 season, against Durham City on May 3rd.1924.


1924. (September) The new stand on the northern (Yale side of the pitch) was destroyed by a storm, which ripped the roof from its fixings and damaged the foundations. The stand was re-erected soon after the storm

1925. (January) The new Yale stand (the shed) was blown down again in a storm in January and was so badly damaged that it couldnt be re-erected.

1928. Concrete terracing laid to the paddock area in front of the Mold Road stand.

1929. A new covered stand (100 yards long and 25 feet deep) replaced the curved-roof structure at the Plas Coch end of the ground. Built at a cost of £750, which was provided by the Supporters Association, the stand incorporated ladder beams with diagonal cross members, which ran the full length along the front of the stand beneath the roof. The stand was officially opened by the President of the Welsh FA prior to the international game against Ireland on 2nd February.

1930. The ladder-beam design was also used for a new stand which replaced the earlier structure on the northern (Yale side) of the pitch. This stand was opened with an official ceremony, prior to the international match against England on 22nd November.

1931. (September) The angled/wing stand was constructed on Mold Road, filling the gap between the Mold Road and Plas Coch stands and providing covered accommodation for 1000 supporters. Construction work started in July and was completed in time for the opening game of the season against Chester on September 2nd. The £700 construction costs were paid by The Supporters Association

1931. (October) The length of the new stand on the northern (Yale Stand) side of the pitch was extended and its depth was increased down to the touchline, while retaining the ladder-beam design to match the Plas Coch end of the ground.
With accommodation for up to 7,000 supporters, the stand on the northern side of the pitch was now 70 yards long and 42 feet deep, and had been built at a total cost of around £900 (£368 of which was paid by the Supporters Association).
The stand was officially opened prior to the Wales v Scotland international match on 31st October 1931. The height of the ‘Spion Kop’ terracing at the Crispin Lane end of the ground had also been raised again to increase capacity for this match.

1937. Both the Yale Stand and The Plas Coch Stands were each extended to merge into a single structure, while new terracing was also laid to both ends of the ground in time for the FA Cup tie against Manchester City on 16th January.


1948. A conversion of the area under the Mold Road stand provided new changing rooms for players, while a new entrance was erected at the northern (Yale side) of the ground. The work to the dressing rooms had been started in April 1947 and completed in time for the international match against Ireland on March 10th 1948.

1952. Old terracing removed and new raised concrete terracing laid on the Crispin Lane end of ground to form the kop.

1957. (summer) Ground improvements included a new entrance and turnstiles next to The Turf Hotel, with a new stand in the enclosure providing 250 tip-up seats for season ticket holders. The concrete terraces on the kop were extended to merge into the Yale side of the ground to increase ground capacity to 40,000 and a new concrete boundary wall was also built around the pitch to replace railings.

1959. New floodlights switched on for the home tie against Swindon on 30th September.

1962. A new 700-seater stand, which was comprised of a reclaimed balcony from The Majestic Cinema in Wrexham, was erected on the kop and opened for the start of the 1962/63 season. First known as ‘The Busfield Stand’ due to an advertising hoarding on the front of the structure, the stand later became known as ‘The Pigeon Loft’. The stand was bought and erected at a cost of £4,000, which was paid by the Supporters Association.

1972. A New £80,000 stand was opened on the Yale side of the ground, which was comprised of an upper tier of seated accommodation and lower terraces for standing spectators close to the pitch. The base of the stand also provided office space for club officials, changing rooms and the hospitality rooms, which are now known as the Centenary Club.

1978. Another two-tired stand costing around £200,000 was opened at the Plas Coch end of ground, replacing the earlier ‘tech end’. Like the Yale Stand, the new stand was comprised of an upper tier for seated supporters and a lower section of terraces.

1999. The Mold Road Stand and the old changing rooms of The Turf Tavern were demolished to make way for the current 3,500-seater Mold Road Stand.
Attached Images
File Type: jpg Storm blew down stand again Jan 1st and 2nd 1925.jpg (98.4 KB, 24 views)

Last edited by eastsussex; 6th December 2020 at 16.28:36..
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Old 19th December 2020, 11.46:54   #840-0 (permalink)
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Default Re: The sad case of a founding members and player of Wrexham Football Club (Massive history thread!)

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I also think that the taller section of The Turf Hotel was originally constructed as a square building (as shown on the tithe map attachment a few posts back) and was originally known as just another part of The Turf Tavern.
There are later newspaper articles which refer to people dining in ‘the large room at The Turf Tavern’ and I believe that these articles reflect an earlier name used for this side of the tavern; i.e. before this section was renamed as The Grandstand.

The earliest reference that I can find to this section being called The Grandstand, comes from a newspaper report of cricketers having dinner in ‘The Grandstand’ in 1841, and so I believe that as the popularity of the races increased, a decision was made to add a balcony to the taller section, at the end of 1830’s, which resulted in the addition of a canted bay and a balcony (as attachment 1) and the taller section subsequently was renamed as The Grandstand

I also believe that The Turf Tavern garden (also shown on another attachment a few posts back) was originally a field, which belonged to the estate of the house known as The Crispin.
There is a map from 1793-1795 (previously posted) which shows a diagonal boundary line/hedgerow from The Crispin to another very small plot of land which had been sectioned off from the rest of The Racecourse. This smaller plot was the location where The Turf Tavern was built. I have added the boundary line on a later map (attached)
It is difficult to envisage now, because the Mold Road end of Crispin Lane was diverted slightly to the west (towards The Racecourse) in the 1890’s, but back in the 18th Century, Crispin Lane was just a four foot wide track way, which had evolved on the silted up ditch of Wat’s Dyke. This lane had served as a traditional thoroughfare, which connected the original Rhosddu Lane with Hope Street (now Mold Road) and The Racecourse extended right up to the hedge line of Wat’s Dyke’s ditch/Crispin Lane. The lane became known, locally, as a lovers lane and was made more accessible with a gravel surface in the 1850’s, but the diversion works in the 1890’s swallowed up the old Turf Tavern garden, which at that time, still backed onto the original lane. After the diversion works an L shaped area of land, which was comprised of two different plots, remained on The Racecourse side of Crispin Lane. The first plot, which faced onto Crispin Lane, had previously been the location of the armoury and headquarters of the volunteer force of the Royal Welsh Fusiliers, which was demolished during the diversion works and was sold as a builders yard. The second plot faced onto Mold Road (where the charity shop is today) and was sold to the same buyer at the same auction. (as Attachment 2).
The land on which the railway was built, was at one time known as ‘Crispin Field’ and there was another field, beyond the Yale Stand, which was know as Crispin Croft.
There was also a field known as ‘Crispin Meadow’ on Stansty Park and another Crispin Field between Stansty Lodge and Plas Coch, although I imagine that the field between The Crispin and The Turf Tavern (including the Turf Tavern Garden) as shown on the attachment, would also have been known as Crispin Field at some point in the distant past.
Often, if a building is extended and rendered over to aesthetically bind both parts of the structure together, then a joint may appear between the two parts of the building. This happens because a different brick has been used to extend the building and the type of brick used has a different porosity than the original bricks used for original part of the building.
As the render dries, this difference in bricks becomes apparent due to cracks in the render, where the two types of bricks were joined, or also in the appearance of the render itself, which absorbs into the different types of bricks accordingly, depending on their porosity.
This ‘shadowing’ in render is a sure sign that a building has been extended, and which can be seen on the two photo’s that I have attached, showing the side of the current Turf Hotel.
To the right of both photos (upper right above the doorway) you can see a darker shade in the pebbledashing on the outer walls of The Turf Hotel- where the balcony was built as an extension onto the original building. But also, you can see the shadows of the original quoins, before the balcony was added.
Quoins were originally comprised of masonry blocks that added strength to the corners of buildings, but were later comprised of bricks that were laid slightly proud of the rest of the walls, which could then be rendered, while the toothed pattern of the quoins provided a decorative feature.
On all sections of The Turf Hotel today, the quoins are rendered (to look like masonry quoins) and painted to highlight this feature, but if you look to the right of both photos attached (taken from opposing angles) then you can see the darker shadowing in the render, which highlights the toothed pattern of the original quoins, before the rear of the Turf was extended with a balcony. You can also see that the roof over the balcony is of a different design, with a different pitch (slope).
As posted many times previously, the original Turf Tavern (the lower section of the current Turf Hotel) was built between 1795 and 1819, and this part of the pub still exists today. But a new taller section (where the bar area is today) was built sometime around 1830, just a few metres away from the tavern, as a more exclusive establishment for the more well-healed racegoers..
Initially, this new section was a square building, which was known in 1841 as 'The Grandstand' although originally it may have not had a balcony, but rather, windows, which overlooked the finishing line. But in 1854, the course was upgraded and the buildings were joined together at first floor level, by means of an undercroft. At the same time, the taller section was extended with a balcony and one corner of this square building was hacked off to accommodate an angled double door, which provided access to the new balcony.
In 1913, all sections of the Turf were renovated. The undercroft, which had previously only joined the two buildings at first floor level, was now bricked up, to form a ground floor lounge also, while the windows were replaced and the external timber framed facade at the rear of the taller section was ripped out and re-clad with the rendered panels that still adorn the rear of the building today. The doorway onto the balcony was also bricked up at this time and the outer skin was filled with the same rendered panels.

Last edited by eastsussex; 19th December 2020 at 11.53:09..
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